The SB&WRC project is supported by the European program Interreg VA France (Channel) England and receives financial support from the ERDF.

Since 2013, Construction21 organises an international competition to highlight sustainable and exemplary projects: buildings, districts and infrastructures. Among the entries, the implemented solutions are various and innovative.

These solutions continue to demonstrate the breakthrough of new technologies and innovations such as bio-based materials, whilst also highlighting their rising popularity among professionals in the mainstream. The 2018 edition counts numerous candidates who chose to use low-carbon materials, more than in the previous editions, with 28 buildings and over 103 contestants across 17 countries showcasing these approaches. In France, the ratio reaches almost 30% with 18 projects presenting bio-based and/or recycled materials.

You can already browse these case studies and discover their solutions including: wood and straw-bale construction, local raw earth bricks, wood wool, cellulose wadding, cork insulation, earth coatings and more.

This year’s competition also counts 4 case studies from the UK, two of them showcasing circular economy materials. This is where we can see a major difference between French and British candidates: on one side of the Channel, a growing use of materials from agricultural coproducts, while on the other side there is a genuine interest for reuse and recycling of construction materials. Discover these two British candidates:

Beyond France and England, other countries present a growing interest for these lower carbon solutions including in Belgium, Germany, Luxembourg and Italy. 

You can vote for your favourite projects all summer long: buildings, districts and infrastructures. On September 20th, the champions of each Construction21 platform will be revealed. They will then enter the international finals to win an Award at the COP24 in December, in Poland.

                 

Last updated on the 10-07-2018 by Clément Gaillard

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