The SB&WRC project is supported by the European program Interreg VA France (Channel) England and receives financial support from the ERDF.

The BRE Centre for Innovative Construction Materials (BRE CICM) at the University of Bath was established in 2006. The centre works in partnership with BRE (formerly Building Research Establishment) and has 20 academic staff and over 40 researchers, including PhD students, conducting world-leading research in: low carbon cements and concrete materials; innovative concrete structures; timber engineering; eco-materials (including bio-based materials); and energy performance of materials. BRE CICM facilities includes the University of Bath’s Building Research Park in Wroughton, Wiltshire. This unique facility includes equipment for natural performance and weathering testing of novel materials and whole construction elements such as wall panels, as well as a large environmental chamber for simulated climate testing.

 The research activities of the BRE CICM are driven by developing lower energy and lower carbon solutions for construction materials and technologies for new build and the renovation of existing buildings and infrastructure. The BRE CICM works closely with industry partners which increases the impact of its work.

Recent research activities of relevance to the SB&WRC project includes work on developing prefabricated straw bale construction, hemp-lime construction. In the project BRE CICM will take lead in development of novel prototype using wheat straw, including design and evaluation, and will also lead work on production, deployment and assessment of all three prototypes. The primary benefits for the University of Bath are derived from potential exploitable IP of the work and the wider impact of the research for the construction industry.

Staff from BRE CICM working on the project include Prof. Pete Walker, Dr Dan Maskell, Dr Aurélie Laborel-Preneron, and Helen Perryman.

Website: http://www.bath.ac.uk/

           

Last updated on the 10-07-2018 by Clément Gaillard

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