Everything about green walls that you should know

 

The walls are the accent and strength of every commercial building. It is the area where you usually install wall access panels to protect crucial components. 
With the growing pollution and environmental deterioration, experts are looking for more ways to minimize these effects. Recently, you may have seen a trend in green buildings because it helps create a cleaner way of helping the environment.  

The exact definition for this particular agriculture or urban landscape combines engineering and art. Green walls have successfully added value and beauty to interiors worldwide since the 1970s. Living green walls are a profound testimonial to excellent design, plant selection, engineering, and plant care.
Because of its environmental benefits and positive effects on interior design, architects often incorporate this wall style to add a little personality to your commercial building.   
 

What is a green wall ?

Green walls are vertical structures with different plants or other greenery. Professionals often plant vegetation in soil, stone, or water growth medium. Because the walls have living plants, they usually feature built-in irrigation systems.  

Green walls differ from facades, often crawling outside commercial building walls, using them as structural support. The growth medium of green walls is on the surface or structure of the wall, compared with plants rooted in the ground. Furthermore, the greenery of facades can take time to grow enough to cover an entire wall, while green walls may be pre-grown.  

Intelligent and active green walls are similar to traditional green walls and serve more purposes because of artificial intelligence and technology. The features of an innovative living wall can be automated and monitored or enhance the effects.  

 

Benefits of green walls  

 

Helps purify air  

Plants significantly enhance air condition. Green walls filter the air and convert CO2 into oxygen. Many studies prove that plants and the microbes in soil media absorb harmful Volatile Organic compounds and convert them into a mixture that plants use for food.  

  

Enhances ambiance and relieves stress  

Everyone wants an environment that can instantly enhance your mood when you enter a particular area. You can usually feel this when having walks in nature or parks. Since green walls are plant-based structures, cleaner air leads to lesser health complaints such as headaches and respiratory allergies and increases focus and attention. Complaints such as headaches, irritated eyes, sore throats, and tiredness diminish. In offices with plenty of greenery, there is a noticeable decrease in absence due to illness.  

  

Reduces room temperature  

Plants absorb sunlight. More accurately, 50% is absorbed and reflects about 30% of energy. They help create a cooler environment during the summer and reduce energy costs.  

  

Reduces ambient noise  

Green walls can also act as a sound barrier to a commercial building. They absorb 41% more sound than a traditional facade, which reduces up to 8 dB. Hence, the environment becomes much quieter inside and outside the building, with noise levels similar to those in nature.  

  

Boosts productivity  

Positive moods are directly linked to the sense of well-being, enhancing learning and more efficient decision-making on complex tasks. Green exposure also results in more excellent logical reasoning and more unique approaches. Incorporating green walls can increase productivity in a workplace by about 15%.   

  

Enhance social interaction  

Being in a green environment significantly brings people together. Experts demonstrated that small-scale greenery, in particular, positively affects social cohesion in neighborhoods. In this regard, areas with more vegetation suffer less from violence, aggression, and vandalism.   

If you're planning to try incorporating green walls in your commercial building, ensure that you hire an expert to ensure that your green wall project is successful! 

 buildings
 vegetalisation
 air quality
 health and comfort

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  • Chris Jackson

    Business Development Manage

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