Building energy efficient communities

 buildings  social aspects  communities  renovation  residential
Published by youris.com EEIG

In many EU countries multi-family dwellings represent the dominant residential solution. But structural renovations to cut emissions and save energy may be a real challenge in such contexts, if the communities are not properly involved in the process

 

Watch the video here: http://www.buildheat.eu/building-energy-efficient-communities/

 

 

In most EU countries, half of the residential stock was built before the introduction of thermal regulations. But building renovation is particularly challenging for multi-family dwellings, where socio-economic conditions often represent a barrier. The only approach is to involve people from the beginning.

 

This is what some families have experienced in a block of flats in Zaragoza, one of the demonstration sites of the European project BuildHeat. A social worker helped the tenants to accept the changes, which is something quite innovative in this kind of project.

 

 

By Claudio Rocco

Moderated by : Clément Gaillard

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